Study Programme (at least 290 hours of teaching for the entire year – 60 ECTS; or at least 145 hours of teaching per semester and 30 ECTS).

  • D = distance learning courses (synchronous and/or asynchronous)
  • H = hybrid courses (on-campus meetings and online assignments)
  • P = face to face in class
    All classes can be followed completely at a distance 

* Not open to 3A students
** Limited to 5 international students, first come first served

I choose this course

How are human beings coping with the increasingly fast and changing pace of modern society? Are our brains equipped to cope with the incessant drive for innovation and rapidly evolving scenarios?

In this course we will analyse the complex psychological mechanisms that drive human attitudes and behaviour in a wide range of issues of growing importance. Drawing on traditional psychological theories as well as up to date research, our aim will be to question the evidence supporting these models and theories and critically assess their validity.

Starting with a basic introduction to experimental social psychology, each class will be based on a specific theme such as inter-group behaviour, group influence, environmental psychology, cyberpsychology, psychology in the media and political psychology.

Using a hands-on approach, students will be asked to take part in games, discussions and experimental design to develop critical thinking and draw knowledge from their own experience whilst heightening self-awareness

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This course tackles the issue of the rise of journalism understood as a distinct set of practices and interests. Journalism emerged in the late 19th century in various western countries (France, the US and more marginally UK will be used as examples in the run of the course). But to understand this historical turning-point it is necessary to take a step back and to present the rise of a culture of printing and reading in western societies starting in the 15th century. Parallel to that major cultural shift a rise of a culture of news emerged and little by little "the world came to know about itself" (Pettegree, 2014). The (short) presentation of this long history will constitute the first part. Thus news production and news consumption did not for a long time mean "journalism" (even if the word existed). The second part of the course will focus on the changes that occurred in the 19th century on both sides of the Atlantic that gave birth to what we know as "journalism": the monopoly of a group of professional actors over the production of information. As a conclusion we will raise the open question of the future of that monopoly that dominated the 20th century.

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What do people refer to when they talk about "Ireland"? Do they mean "the Republic of Ireland" or the island as a whole, including Northern Ireland as if there were no border?
In fact, over the years, the Irish Border has become softer, all the more so that today its physical manifestation is difficult to discern. However, now that the UK is leaving the EU, its only main land border with another EU member-state is shared with the Republic of Ireland. After two decades of an open border, and cross-border peacebuilding, Brexit could destabilise the Irish peace-process and the Irish economy. If the deal still has to be delineated by Brexit negotiators, the Irish Border is now back in the limelight.
Starting from these recent political developments, this course is designed to question the notion of Border(s) and use it as a stepping- stone to better understand contemporary Ireland, assuming that even though it is an island, Ireland has always been open to the world. Until 1920, its political centre was in London, i.e. beyond the Irish sea; the partition of the island into two separate countries has shaped Irish politics North and South alike; the Irish diaspora has enabled the country to maintain economic and political ties with the US on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean; Ireland's entry into the EEC and its commitment to European integration has played an important role in the modernization of Irish politics, economy and society; more recently, for the first time in its history, Ireland became a country of inward migration, welcoming people from abroad attracted by the job prospects offered by the rapid economic growth of the Celtic Tiger
The objective of this course is therefore to introduce students to contemporary Ireland and to deepen their understanding of Irish politics and society, both North and South of the Border, in order to equip them with a better understanding of the implications of a possible hardening of the Border in the context of Brexit.
The course is organised as follows:
Class 1: General introduction
This part is going to broach the main political events that marked Irish history since 1801, how the Irish people managed to progressively assert their sovereignty and how the Irish state developed; what Ireland and the Irish people look like today.
Class 2, 3, 4: Northern Ireland.
This part focuses on the development of political violence in Northern Ireland and how the Good Friday Agreement ratified in 1998, the devolution process and European integration deeply transformed and normalised Northern Irish politics. Emphasis will also be laid on the current political institutions and most recent developments in Northern Irish politics.
Class 5, 6, 7: Ireland and European integration
This part aims to illustrate the complex relationship between Irish sovereignty and European integration. It focuses on the implications of entry into the EEC; how European integration greatly contributed to the Irish economic boom and social modernization; how the Irish people perceived European integration; what role the Single Market played in improving the relationship between the North and the South and what the implications of a hard Brexit could be.
Class 8, 9, 10: Immigration to Ireland
Over the past 25 years, the Irish population has reversed its downward trend, thanks to migration from the EU or from other countries. Be they workers or asylum-seekers, the arrival of migrants has had a deep impact on Irish society as a whole, forcing the development of an Irish migration policy and challenging the notion of Irish identity

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Western Europe, far before the start of the European Integration process, has been the motherland of the progressive construction of the modern State as a mode of political organization of societies. Especially inventive, Europe invented both representative government with parliamentary regime (often called the “Westminster Model”) and modern, rational-legal public administration. As a matter of fact, the birth and growth of such a politico-administrative State have followed different paths in the various countries of Europe, ending with the development of various “trajectories of stateness”. This course is a (modest) attempt to familiarize the students with the common features and the diversity of politico-administrative structuration of Western European States – taking the EU as a space for comparison.

Cours mutualisé avec 4A

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This course is intended as part of the curriculum for students enrolled in the "DU Anglophone" and as a "cours d'ouverture". The course is organised in 10 two-hour sessions. The last session is dedicated to the final assessment.
Its aim is to examine the evolution of health care systems in Britain and in the United States. It will address the following topics, though the upcoming general election in Britain that might well see the continuation of Conservative reforms in Britain (8 June 2017) and the Trump presidency will probably dictate some updates as both Theresa May and Donald Trump pledged to introduce major changes in the electoral campaigns.

  • Origins of Western welfare states: Europe and/v. the USA. Providing health care and other insurance services was a way to slow down the rise of socialism and to safeguard capitalism.
  • Interwar years: Keynesianism, 1929 Great Depression and the New Deal (economic theory and practice, similarities between Roosevelt's policies and Keynes's theory though the latter was published slightly later than the former)
  • Post-War Years: the Beveridge Report and the British Labour Government. How a Liberal report was implemented by a "socialist" government. The Roosevelt-Truman years and the post-war consensus in the US and UK, with special attention to how the British NHS was created and to the debates over a federal welfare system in the US.
  • The Johnson Years: Medicare and Medicaid providing conditional health care to the most fragile segments of the population.
  • The end of the post-war consensus and rise of neoliberalism. Consequences on national health-care programmes.
  • Thatcherism, Blatcherism and the reform of the NHS and its consequences.
  • Obama and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (and opposition to it...). Obama's campaign speeches, what the plan consists in and how it is funded. What debates did it fuel and Supreme Court rulings on thorny issues.
  • Trump's election and "Obamacare": did the Americans who voted for Trump support the repeal of ACA? Republicanism and ACA.
  • The NHS today and conclusions.

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In order to understand properly the structure of today's world economy, it is necessary to see it as the outcome of a long-term evolution, whose implications for the present are far from neutral. This course presents a number of fundamental topics in international economics from an historical perspective. Particular emphasis is given to 19th and 20th century economic history, but the approach is thematic rather than chronological. Covered subjects include: market integration and trade policy; factor movements and international business; international banking and finance; growth and business cycles; and international political economy. The aim is to provide participants with a number of useful interpretative tools, allowing them to analyse the economic foundations of international relations nowadays.


Economic theories have played (and still play) a crucial role in the justification and evaluation of the process of European integration. Lack of economic efficiency has often been invoked in order to criticize the way the EU allegedly constructed itself: based on the model of 19th-century German unification, European unification would have allegedly consisted of a premature rushing of economic integration, imposed from the top with the aim of making it the engine of political integration. A less superficial analysis of European economic history shows, however, that limits of such an interpretation, and invites a reassessment of the direction of causal links between political and economic factors. This seminar aims at analyzing the economic integration process, at studying its causes and consequences, as well as at evaluating its actual suitability to the Continental economy. Treated topics include: the customs union, the common agricultural policy, the single market, the monetary union, and the fiscal union.
Stefano Ugolini

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This course is an introduction to a major current sub-topic of Human Resource Management in the public sector, namely the management of rewards, aiming at attracting and retaining talents. Our perspective is the one of Political Science, sensitive to all the political dimensions, the various institutional, social, historical, cultural, demographic constraints which interfere in the instauration and evolution of a system of rewards for public servants in a given national context. Our goal is, by the end of the course, that students become familiar with the main explicit and underlying issues at stake when a HR policy of rewarding public servants is discussed, adopted and implemented.
The course comprises 5 chapters:

  1. “Managing rewards”, what are we talking about?
  2. The management of/by rewards in the private sector, a “model” for the Civil Service?
  3. The actual management of/by rewards in nowadays Civil Service: a diversity of practices & marginal use of PRP so far
  4.  Performance-Related-Pay: limits, faults and deadlocks
  5. Can we imagine a system of motivation & reward-for-performance of civil servants which would be compatible with the Public Service values & ethics?

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The lecture aims to present the normative power of the IOs, through the dynamics of the Creators-Creature paradigm in Public International Law. The fundamental distinction between primary and derived subjects of International Law guides the analysis on the origins, as well as on the use and the limits of the normative power in the international arena (apanage of State sovereignty; principal of conferral, theory of competences, etc.). A comparative approach based on a classification of IOs is also key in order to clarify the transcending legal effects of the normative power not only in the international legal order, but also in the domestic legal orders.

I choose this course

Cours mutualisé avec 4A

The origins of feminism in the United States are intertwined with the reconstruction of the country after the Civil War and with the shaping of a national identity within which different forms of inequality – mainly gender and racial inequalities – play an essential role. The aim of this course is to historicize, contextualize and problematize the relationship between feminism and politics in the United States from the 19 century up to our own historical moment through literary texts. How does literature echo the debates on gender and on the part of women in society? To what extent can systematic feminist discourse find its place in literary works? How are the ambiguities, controversies and even conflicts within the feminist movements depicted in literature? We will go over the major highlights in the history of feminism in the United States while focusing on specific topics raised by novels and short stories by Louisa May Alcott, Kate Chopin, Margaret Atwood, Alice Munro, Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, Roxane Gay, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and Mary Gaitskill. The course will also refer to other literary works as well as examine the expressions of feminism in the current American political context.